McDonald’s could learn from Domino’s.

About two weeks ago McDonald’s launched a Twitter hashtag that had less than favorable results. #McDStories, which they hoped would bring up all kinds of happy, fun memories at McDonald’s instead brought up a number of bad stories. Quoting one tweeter, “the hashtag became a bashtag”. Here are a few:

PRNewser had an article about this ordeal, “McDonald’s Had A ‘Contingency Plan’ For Twitter Promo Gone Awry“. The article explains that McDonald’s knew that having an open-ended campaign could potentially spread stories they didn’t want people hearing about, so the hashtag was promoted for less than 2 hours. The author goes on to complain that rather than just pulling the promotion, McDonald’s should take the opportunity to acknowledge there are numerous issues in their stores that need correction.

Specifically, the author uses Domino’s as an example. In 2009 two employees made a video about all of the nasty things they do to food. Domino’s knew they had to do something to recover and re-branded themselves. They launched a “Making it right” campaign that included a website, showusyourpizza.com, for customers to post photos of the pizza they receive from Domino’s. There are also commercials showing the CEO and others delivering new pizza’s to customers who posted photos of less than desirable pizza.

A statement from Rick Wion, the companies social media director, seems proud that the hashtag was not up longer than it was, and says that because they caught it only 2% of tweets regarding McDonald’s that day included #McDStories. There were still more than 1,600 tweets that were mostly unfavorable. Ignoring stories of rats, broken teeth, and food poisoning will do very little to help the companies public relations- especially the fact that there have been no apologies made to those people.

Twitter can be a highly useful tool for companies, but McDonald’s is only asking for stories instead of interacting with their customers. An apology through Twitter is worth much more than no apology at all, and McDonald’s failed to acknowledge their mistakes in any way besides stopping the promotion of #McDStories.

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3 thoughts on “McDonald’s could learn from Domino’s.

  1. Wow! I definitely agree with your title. McDonald’s handled their negative press very poorly and didn’t even want to address the problems people were having with them. I think that when a company tries to push the dirt under the rug, it makes them look even worse. Negative attention is bad but ignoring and not addressing the negative attention is even worse. Sounds like McDonald’s attempted social media outreach efforts were one giant ‘McFail’ !

    • I know! McFail indeed haha. And now they’ve got a problem with one of their latest radio ads accusing pit bulls of being dangerous. Not a good time to be working higher up at McD’s!

  2. Pingback: I don’t get paid to fix privacy settings. | cmetalkpr

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